Frequently Asked Questions


Q: How do I know which visa type would suit me?
A: Well, it depends on whether you come here as a holiday maker, an expat employee or a retiree, and how long you plan to be here for. For a short-stay of up to 30 days, you may apply for a visa-on-arrival at a Thai port of entry. Or if you apply for a non-immigrant visa in a Thai consulate in your country, you will be allowed to stay for up to 90 days. In case of a longer stay (for an employee or a retiree), we strongly suggest that you apply for an appropriate visa in a Thai consulate beforehand. The earlier you become familiar with the documentation and procedures required of you, the likelier the chance that you are able to plan things ahead without too much complication.


Q: I am not sure yet about what kind of job I want to do while living in Thailand. Can you recommend something?
A: There are lots and lots of people who come to Thailand as a visitor first, and then decide to settle down and find a job. If you hold an internationally recognized language teaching certificate, the most practical option is to become a language tutor at a language school, a very popular business in recent years. In other cases, you may give private lessons of English or any other subject to students in your area. Other than (language) teaching, you may consider a job like a freelance consultant or an officer in a foreign-owned firm, or opening up a local business (e.g. coffee shop, restaurant, massage parlor, tourist-oriented company).


Q: Do I need to speak Thai fluently to get by in Thailand?
A: We don't think you need to be fully conversant in Thai before arrival. Many Thai people will make an effort trying to understand your Thai and respond to what you say. More and more people (especially the younger generations) now have communicative English proficiency. Most employees in both government and private sectors, as well as in the service industry, can communicate at least in simple English.


Q: How much will my monthly expenses be like?
A: It all depends on your personal lifestyle and habit of spending, as well as the area or city you want to live in. The following table gives you an idea of the expenses that will incur for cosmopolitan (e.g. Bangkok) and provincial (e.g. Pattaya) lifestyles.


Expense types Greater Bangkok area (THB) Other cities/towns (THB)
Rent (one-bedroom/studio apartment) 8,000 – 15,000 5,000 – 12,000
General groceries 7,000 - 10,000 4,000 – 8,000
Outside meals and entertainment 5,000 - 10,000 3,000 – 6,000
General utilities (electricity, water, gas, landline telephone and internet connection, mobile phone service, satellite TV) 5,000 – 7,000 4,000 – 6,000
Transportation (a combination of rides on public transportation, taxi and occasional use of personal car, inclusive of petrol cost) 2,500 – 5,000 1,000 – 2,000 (petrol cost for private motorcycle drive)
Medical services and/or health insurance 1,500 – 3,000 1,000 – 3,000
Miscellaneous (laundry and household cleaning services and immigration fees) 3,000 – 4,000 2,000 – 3,000
Total 32,000 – 54,000 20,000 – 40,000


Q: How much will my monthly expenses be like?

A: It all depends on your personal lifestyle and habit of spending, as well as the area or city you want to live in. The following table gives you an idea of the expenses that will incur for cosmopolitan (e.g. Bangkok) and provincial (e.g. Pattaya) lifestyles.

Q: Can I buy aThai health insurance and have it effective from the first day of my arrival?
A:Yes, very easily. If you do not already have a health insurance from your home country, you can get hold of one provided by an internationally certified Thailand-based company and specify the beginning date of your insurance plan. Please refer to the link to service options on the relocation services webpage.


Q: Is there any word of caution that will help me live and/or work with Thais effectively?
A: Thai people are renowned for their friendliness and easy-going nature. But we suggest that you familiarize yourself with at least some of their values and customs beforehand. Most importantly, Thailand operates on a system of more or less rigid social hierarchy(as observable in many aspects of Thai ways of life). So if you are from a country which values something different or opposite, try not to say things to change this tradition or to make Thais lose face. We have designed the 'cross-cultural orientation' service as another crucial component to your transfer. Please check what's in store on the relocation services webpage.


Q: Can I bring pets with me?
A: Of course, you can. But you have to provide a health certificate (issued by a veterinary authority in your country) with details of specific vaccinations having been administered on the pet. Upon arrival, your pet will normally be subject to a 30-day quarantine period at approved premises, where he/she will receive further tests against contagious diseases.


Q: Can/should I drive in Thailand?
A: If you decide to live in a big city like Bangkok, driving a car is not recommended, mainly due to constant traffic jam problems, even outside rush hours. In provincial towns, driving may be more practical. Whatever you preference, you may need to have an international driver's license handy. But this is only valid for one year, after which you are required to register for a test to obtain a Thai driver's license.

 

 
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